The Diamond Blade Depot
  Home » Catalog  My Account  |  Cart Contents  |  Checkout   

Quick Find
 
Use keywords to find the product you are looking for.
Advanced Search
Select Manufacturer
MK Diamond Products, a diamond blade manufacturerNational Diamond, a diamond saw blade manufacturerPearl Abrasives Company
Barranca DiamondOmega Diamond
D.B.Depot Products
Product Information
Company information
What's New? more
Buy 5 T-SEG 100 Turbo saw blade and get 15% OFF
Buy 5 T-SEG 100 Turbo saw blade and get 15% OFF
MK Diamond Technical Library

1.
MSDS
(Diamond Blade Material Safety Data Sheet)
5.
Understanding Diamond Blades
2.
Manuals & Parts Lists
6.
MK Diamond Blade Troubleshooting
3.
MK saw blade Speed Guidelines
7.
MK Documents
4.
Understanding Construction Materials

MK DiamondDiamond Blade Material Safety Data Sheet
Click here to view or download the MK Diamond blade Material Safety Data Sheet in PDF format.
Back to top
Manuals & Parts Lists
Tile Saw Manuals | Masonry Saw Manuals | Concrete Grinder Manuals | Core Drill Manuals
Tile Saw Manuals

MK-770 EXP
Complete Manual 7.3 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 503 KB






MK-70
Complete Manual 1.9 MB


MK-170 EXP
Complete Manual 3.3 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 376 KB


MK-145 230 Volt
Complete Manual 2.5 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 288 KB



MK-101 Pro24
Complete Manual 5.8 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 788 KB

MK-101 Tracker
Complete Manual 5.5 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 356 KB


MK-101 JCS Rental
Complete Manual 7 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 560 KB


MK-100 Tracker
Complete Manual 5.6 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 357 KB

MK-100 JCS
Complete Manual 7.5 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 482 KB
Back to Manuals & Parts Lists | Back to top
Masonry Saw Manuals
MK-70
Complete Manual 1.9 MB

MK-1080
Complete Manual 3 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 598 KB

MK-1270 & MK-1495
Manual 450 KB
Exploded View & Parts List 420 KB

MK-2000 Electric Saws
Complete Manual 5.5 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 691 KB

MK-2000 Pro Electric Saws
Complete Manual 5 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 607 KB

MK-2005G
Complete Manual 1.6 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 1 MB

MK-5005S
Complete Manual 6 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 1 MB

MK-5000 Gas Saws
Complete Manual 1.7 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 1 MB

MK-BX-3
Complete Manual 4.8 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 417 KB

MK-PX-3
Complete Manual 1.4 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 560 KB
Back to Manuals & Parts Lists | Back to top
Concrete Grinder Manuals
MK-1600 Series
Complete Manual 3.6 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 1.3 MB

MK-20 Series
Complete Manual 2.5 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 1.9 MB

MK-9000 Series
Complete Manual 2.7 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 594 KB




Back to Manuals & Parts Lists | Back to top
Core Drill Manuals
Manta I Manual
Complete Manual 1.9 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 990 KB

Manta II Manual
Complete Manual 2 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 956 KB

Manta III Manual
Complete Manual 2.2 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 1.3 MB

Manta IV Manual
Complete Manual 4.4 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 469 KB

MK-2000P Drill Manual
Complete Manual 85 Kb
Back to Manuals & Parts Lists | Back to top
Speed Guidelines
Tile diamond blade speed recommendations | Stone diamond blade speed recommendations
Lapidary diamond blade speed recommendations | Masonry diamond blade speed recommendations
Concrete diamond blade speed recommendations | Diamond core bit speed recommendations
Tile diamond blade speed recommendations
Diameter Recommended RPM* Maximum RPM**
4" (102mm) 9,075 15,000
5" (127mm) 7,260 12,000
6" (152mm) 6,050 10,185
8" (203mm) 5,185 8,730
9" (229mm) 4,540 7,640
10" (254mm) 3,630 6,115
12" (305mm) 3,025 5,095
12" (305mm) High Speed (Dry)
14" (356mm) 2,270 3,820
14" (356mm) High Speed (Dry)

* Based upon the Optimum Performance Speed calibrated in Surface Feet per Minute (SFM): 9500 + 15%. Not for lapidary blades.
** Based upon ANSI B7.1 & B7.5 guidelines for maximum safe/never exceed speeds.
Back to Speed Guidelines | Back to top
Stone diamond blade speed recommendations
Diameter Recommended
RPM
Never Exceed
RPM
4" (102mm) 9,000 15,200
4-1/2" (114mm) 8,000 13,500
5" (127mm) 7,200 12,200
5-1/2" (14mm) 6,500 11,100
6" (152mm) 6,000 10,100
7" (178mm) 5,100 8,700
8" (203mm) 4,500 7,600
9" (229mm) 4,000 6,700
10" (254mm) 3,600 6,100
12" (305mm) 3,000 5,000
14" (356mm) 2,500 4,300
16" (406mm) 2,200 3,800
18" (457mm) 2,000 3,300
20" (508mm) 1,800 3,000
22" (559mm) 1,600 2,700
24" (610mm) 1,500 2,500
26" (660mm) 1,300 2,300
28" (711mm) 1,200 2,100
30" (762mm) 1,200 2,000
32" (813mm) 1,100 1,900
36" (914mm) 1,000 1,600
42" (1067mm) 800 1,400
48" (1219mm) 700 1,200
* Recommended RPM based on 9,500 SFPM
Back to Speed Guidelines | Back to top
Lapidary diamond blade speed recommendations
Blade MK-297 MK-301 MK-1000 MK-303

Recommended RPM Operating Range
in Surface Feet Per Minute

3000 - 3500 3000 - 4500 4500 - 6000 4500 - 6000
Blade Diameter Approximate Arbor Shaft RPM Range
4" (102mm) 2860 - 3340 2860 - 4300 4300 - 5730 4300 - 5730
5" (127mm) 2290 - 2670 2290 - 3440 3440 - 4580 3440 - 4580
6" (152mm) 1910 - 2230 1910 - 2870 2870 - 3820 2870 - 3820
7" (178mm) 1640 - 1910 1640 - 2460 2460 - 3270 2460 - 3270
8" (203mm) 1430 - 1670 1430 - 2150 2150 - 2870 2150 - 2870
9" (229mm) 1270 - 1490 1270 - 1910 1910 - 2550 1910 - 2550
10" (254mm) 1150 - 1340 1150 - 1720 1720 - 2290 1720 - 2290
12" (305mm) 960 - 1110 960 - 1430 1430 - 1910 1430 - 1910
14" (356mm) 820 - 960 820 - 1230 1230 - 1640 1230 - 1640
16" (406mm) 720 - 840 720 - 1070 1070 - 1430 1070 - 1430
18" (457mm) 640 - 740 640 - 960 960 - 1270 960 - 1270
20" (508mm) 570 - 670 570 - 860 860 - 1150 860 - 1150
24" (610mm) 480 - 560 480 - 720 720 - 960 720 - 960
30" (762mm) 380 - 450 380 - 570 570 - 760 570 - 760
36" (914mm) 320 - 370 320 - 480 480 - 640 480 - 640
Back to Speed Guidelines | Back to top
Masonry diamond blade speed recommendations
Diameter Recommended
RPM
Never Exceed
RPM
4" (102mm) 9,000 15,200
4-1/2" (114mm) 8,000 13,500
5" (127mm) 7,200 12,200
5-1/2" (14mm) 6,500 11,100
6" (152mm) 6,000 10,100
7" (178mm) 5,100 8,700
8" (203mm) 4,500 7,600
9" (229mm) 4,000 6,700
10" (254mm) 3,600 6,100
12" (305mm) 3,000 5,000
14" (356mm) 2,500 4,300
16" (406mm) 2,200 3,800
18" (457mm) 2,000 3,300
20" (508mm) 1,800 3,000
22" (559mm) 1,600 2,700
24" (610mm) 1,500 2,500
26" (660mm) 1,300 2,300
28" (711mm) 1,200 2,100
30" (762mm) 1,200 2,000
32" (813mm) 1,100 1,900
36" (914mm) 1,000 1,600
42" (1067mm) 800 1,400
48" (1219mm) 700 1,200
* Recommended RPM based on 9,500 SFPM
Back to Speed Guidelines | Back to top
Concrete diamond blade speed recommendations
Diameter Recommended
RPM
Never Exceed
RPM
4" (102mm) 9,000 15,200
4-1/2" (114mm) 8,000 13,500
5" (127mm) 7,200 12,200
5-1/2" (14mm) 6,500 11,100
6" (152mm) 6,000 10,100
7" (178mm) 5,100 8,700
8" (203mm) 4,500 7,600
9" (229mm) 4,000 6,700
10" (254mm) 3,600 6,100
12" (305mm) 3,000 5,000
14" (356mm) 2,500 4,300
16" (406mm) 2,200 3,800
18" (457mm) 2,000 3,300
20" (508mm) 1,800 3,000
22" (559mm) 1,600 2,700
24" (610mm) 1,500 2,500
26" (660mm) 1,300 2,300
28" (711mm) 1,200 2,100
30" (762mm) 1,200 2,000
32" (813mm) 1,100 1,900
36" (914mm) 1,000 1,600
42" (1067mm) 800 1,400
48" (1219mm) 700 1,200
* Recommended RPM based on 9,500 SFPM
Back to Speed Guidelines | Back to top
Diamond core bit speed recommendations
Wet Bit Diameter Max/Min RPM*
1" - 2" (25mm - 51mm) 1,200 - 1,000
2-1/4 " - 5" (57mm - 127mm) 1,000 - 500
5-1/4" - 12" (134mm - 305mm) 500 - 250
Dry Bit Diameter Max/Min RPM*
1" - 1-1/2" (25mm - 38mm) 6000 - 2300
1-3/4" (44mm) 5000 - 1600
2" - 2-1/4" (51mm - 57mm) 5000 - 1200
2-1/2" (64mm) 5000 - 800
3" - 5" (76mm - 127mm) 5000 - 700
6" (152mm) 5000 - 600
* Based upon the Optimum Performance Speed
calibrated in Surface feet per Minute (SFM).
Back to Speed Guidelines | Back to top
Understanding Materials
Ceramic Tile | Stone | Masonry | Concrete | Asphalt
Ceramic Tile
Ceramic products are varied and depending on their manufacturing processes, they exhibit their own special qualities and properties. The hardness of the ceramic material is directly attributed to its manufacturing process, and generally references the Mohs Scale to categorize its hardness.

The Manufacturing Process

Ceramic tile production begins with the excavation of clays to be used in the manufacturing process. Depending on the type of tile being produced, any number of two to six different types and colors of clay may be necessary to blend together in a mixture.

The selected bulk clays are mixed with water and this mixture is pumped into large, rotating cylindrical mills, where extreme grinding action pulverizes the clay into uniform and homogenous particles. This substrate is called “body-slip,” and has the consistency of a milk shake.

Next, moisture from the body-slip is evaporated by a spray dryer burner, creating fine particles of uniformly sized dry clay called “powder.” The powder is then fed into molds within a hydraulic press, where it is molded under pressure (approximately 4,000 PSI) to form “green ware” (what the tile is called prior to being fired). The green ware is dried again to further reduce the moisture content, and then travels down “glaze lines” where various types of glazes are applied to the surface.

The glazed green ware travels through a kiln and undergoes a 45-50 minute firing where temperatures can reach 2300°F causing the glaze to fuse to the body. The tile that emerges from this process is very hard, durable and impact resistant.

Hardness of Ceramic Tiles
Water absorption rate, glazes, compression and material all determine the hardness of ceramic tile
The percentage of water absorption by the tile body determines whether the ceramic tile is Impervious, Vitreous, Semi-Vitreous, or Non-Vitreous. From Impervious, where absorption rates of 15% and higher, harness factors change
Most glazes fall in the 5 to 6 Mohs Scale range. However, certain types of floor and porcelain tiles can have compressive strengths of 10,000 PSI and a Mohs hardness factor of 8
Back to Understanding Materials | Back to top
Stone
Natural and precast stones vary significantly in their geographic origin, mineralogical composition, and physical and mechanical properties. There are numerous types of stone to select, with each one exhibiting specific qualities of compressive strength and abrasive resistance.

• Marble • Sandstone
• Granite • Limestone
• Slate/Flagstone • Precast Stones

Additionally, these qualities would dictate appropriate diamond-blade selection to effectively handle cutting requirements. Your choice of stone requires a specific type of diamond Blade.

General Characteristics of Stone

The complex nature and variables of Natural and Precast stone make it difficult to generalize their overall physical and mechanical properties.
Unless the operator has had experience in cutting a particular stone, there are methods that can help predict the stone's sawability, and so determine the “best” diamond blade. The American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) recognizes several physical property measurements that can identify a stone's hardness:
Uniaxial Compressive Strength (UCS)
Measuring basic rock strength parameters. Commonly measured in Pounds Per Square Inch (PSI)
Cerchar Abrasivity Index (CAI)
Measuring a rocks abrasivity for determining cutting wear rates. Defined by a graduated numerical scale: lower numbers indicating less abrasive qualities, and therefore greater hardness.
Mohs Hardness Scale
A scale of hardness applied to minerals that ranges from 1 to 10, and comparatively indicates a mineral's scratch potential. The higher the number the harder the mineral.
Shore Scleroscope Hardness Test
A dynamic indentation hardness test using a number to indicate the height of a rebounding hammer off the surface of the material. The higher the number the harder the material.

It is recommended to review all data relating to a stone's hardness and abrasive qualities to effectively choose the proper diamond blade. No singular Property Measurement Test can define the characteristics a stone would exhibit during the cutting process. As a general reminder for stone diamond blades: tests and industry experience has documented that stone exhibiting a greater degree of hardness and abrasive resistance require softer bond matrixes.
Back to Understanding Materials | Back to top
Masonry
Brick manufacturing today follows fundamental procedures pioneered centuries ago. However, better knowledge of raw materials and their properties, better control of firing and improved kiln designs have resulted in a superior product. The production of bricks centers around the type of clay that is used. Clays occur in three forms (Surface Clays, Fire Clays & Shales). Although they share similar chemical compositions, they will differ in their physical characteristics. All properties of brick are affected by the composition of the raw materials and the manufacturing processes. Essentially brick are produced by: (1) mixing ground clay with water, (2) forming them into desired shapes, (3) then drying and firing them. Establishing a homogenous blend is necessary before subjecting the mixture to one of three forming processes (Stiff–Mud, Soft–Mud or Dry–Press). Next, the process continues with drying, firing and cooling. Kiln firing temperatures during manufacturing graduate from 400°F to 2400°F.

Hardness of Bricks
There are many different types of brick (Building, Facing, Hollow, Paving, Ceramic Glazed and Thin Brick), and different scales of hardness. The strength of a unit is used to determine its durability and cutability. Both compressive strength and absorption are affected by properties of the clay, method of manufacturing and degree of firing. Most bricks have a strength ranging from 3,000 PSI to over 20,000 PSI, with the average being around 10,000 PSI.
Brick may also include different size, type and volume of aggregates to further strengthen the mix.
Back to Understanding Materials | Back to top
Concrete
Four essentials must be known about the concrete to determine proper diamond-blade selection.

1. Compressive Strength
The hardness of concrete is referenced by its compressive strength measured in Pounds per Square Inch (PSI). Cured concrete slabs vary widely in compressive strength; with moisture, temperature, design of mixture additives, cementitious materials and curing processes often determining their measured level of strength. The higher the compressive strength, the harder the material.

Compressive Strength
Concrete Hardness PSI Typical Application
Very hard 8,000 or more Nuclear Plants
Hard 6,000 - 8,000 Bridges, Piers
Medium 4,000 - 6,000 Roads
Soft 3,000 or less Sidewalks, Patios, Parking lots

2. Age of the Concrete
The “age,” or length of curing time, greatly affects how the diamond blade interacts with the concrete. Although methods exist to accelerate the curing process, the “state” of concrete from initial pouring to a period of 72 hours and over can be defined in 3 distinct increments, and is influenced by temperature, weather, moisture, aggregate, time of year, admixtures and composition.

State 1 – 0 to 8 hours
The concrete is considered in its “green“ state 0 to 8 hours after the pour, meaning it has set but has not hardened completely. With green concrete, the sand in the mixture has not bonded to the mortar blend firmly and will cause extreme abrasive action once the physics of sawing begins. Further, the slurry generated by green concrete is equally as abrasive and will require special undercutting protection for the steel core of the diamond blade. Typically, sawing control joints of highways, industrial flooring, driveways, runways and similar projects is performed during this state.

State 2 – 8 to 24 hours
The concrete is considered as cured 8 to 24 hours after the pour. The sand is held firmly adhered to the overall mixture. Generally, control joints established in State 1 are widened during this time.

State 3 – 24 to 72
The concrete is considered as cured 24 to 72 hours after the pour. The sand is held firmly in the mortar mixture, and the overall abrasive actions and properties of the concrete are greatly diminished. Now, consideration of the aggregates, compression strength and steel content of the concrete become important factors in determining proper diamond-blade selection.

3. Aggregates and Sand

Aggregates are the granular fillers in cement that can occupy as much as 60 to 75% of the total volume. They influence the way both green and cured concrete perform. Aggregates can be naturally occurring minerals, sand and gravel, crushed stone or manufactured sand. The most desirable aggregates used in concrete are triangular or square in shape, and with hard, dense, well-graded and durable properties. The average size and composition of aggregates greatly influence the cutting characteristics and selection of the diamond blade. Large aggregates tend to cause blades to cut slower; smaller aggregates allow the blades to cut faster.

Difficulty Average Aggregate Size
Harder to Cut (Blade wears slower) 1-1/2" or more
1-1/2" to 3/4"
3/4" to 3/8"
Easier to Cut (Blade wears faster) Pea gravel (less than 3/8")

Aggregate hardness is referenced by the Mohs Scale. This scale assigns arbitrary quantitative units, ranging from 1 through 10, by which the scratch hardness of a mineral is determined. Each unit of hardness is represented by a mineral that can scratch any other mineral having a lower-ranking number. The minerals are ranked from talc or 1 (the softest), upward through diamond or 10 (the hardest). Hard aggregates shorten blade life and reduce cutting speed.

Sand composition is another factor in determining the hardness characteristics of the cement and the abrasive properties of the mortar. Three types of sand are generally used in the mixture:
• River Sand (round nonabrasive)
• River Bank Sand (sharp abrasive)
• Manufactured Sand (sharp abrasive)
River Bank Sand and Manufactured Sand are more abrasive than River Sand. The more abrasive the sand is, the harder the bond-matrix requirements. Sharper, more geometrically defined sands also require harder bonds.

Mohs Hardness Scale


Aggregate Classification Map of the United States
     Soft         Medium Soft         Medium         Medium Hard         Hard


Aggregate Classification

One of the key factors that determines the performance of diamond saws and drill bits is the type of aggregate in the concrete or asphalt being cut.

Aggregate is defined as the stone, gravel and sand used in paving materials like concrete and asphalt. Aggregate may be crushed or uncrushed. Crushed aggregate may be limestone, granite, sandstone, traprock, etc. Sand and gravel are typically found in natural deposits, like riverbeds, stream courses or Lake Basins.

Aggregate is generally divided into “fine aggregate” (passes through a No 4 sieve, 0.187’ square opening) and “coarse aggregate” (almost all of which is retained on a N0 4 sieve and may range in size up to 3’ particles).

While recognizing that aggregate size and type can change completely in a short distance on a given project (say highway). It is generally true that aggregates are similar in certain geographical areas. This is primarily due to local availability of one type of material and the prohibitive cost of importing anything else.
This aggregate map is not intended, nor should it be used to precisely define all aggregate in a given area. Instead, it is published as a “general guide” to the predominant aggregate hardness (as it relates to sawability) likely to be encountered in the area defined by the various colors.

It should also be pointed out that any aggregate can be sawed. However, the cost of sawing is usually directly related to aggregate hardness and size. This map is simply a reference tool to provide a general sense of aggregate similarity in various areas of the country. A brief description of the predominant aggregate in each state follows.
Alabama Aggregates vary from favorable materials such as limestone, sandstone, and blast furnace slag to hard materials such as quartzite and chert. The harder aggregate materials are found in the Central and Southwest sections of the state.
Alaska The predominant aggregates are gravel and crushed rock and would be classified as medium-hard.
Arizona A medium-hard gravel aggregate is encountered in most of the state and a medium-soft decomposed granite in some areas in the northern part of the state. The sand content tends to be highly abrasive.
Arkansas A medium-hard granite aggregate is encountered in the southern two-thirds of the state and a hart chert river gravel aggregate in the northern and northeastern part of the state.
California Medium-hard gravel aggregates are encountered in the El Centro through San Diego area as well as in the northern part of the state. A medium to medium-soft aggregate is encountered in the San Clemente, Los Angeles, Paso Robles, Lancaster and Bakersfield area.
Colorado The northern part of the state has medium to medium-soft aggregate comprised of decomposed granite. The Denver area and southeastern and eastern sections have medium-soft decomposed granite, limestone and gravel. The Colorado Springs area consists of a medium-hard gravel.
Connecticut Generally the aggregates consist of medium to medium-hard traprock and dolomite.
Delaware The major portion of the state contains medium-soft traprock and limestone aggregates. The Wilmington area does produce a medium-hard gravel aggregate.
Florida Generally the aggregates are composed of soft shell and argillaceous, siliceous and dolomitic limestone. The northern area sometimes uses hard Georgia and Alabama aggregates
Georgia Aggregates in the northern part of the state are medium-soft sandstone and limestone. The southern three-quarters of the state has medium-hard to hard granite, schist, gneiss, and quartzite aggregates.
Hawaii Aggregate conditions throughout the islands are of the medium-hard, basaltic type.
Idaho Generally medium-hard crushed stone and gravel aggregates.
Illinois Aggregates in this state may be divided into three sections, the northern area medium to hard gravel, the central section medium gravel and limestone, the southern area soft limestone.
Indiana The state has generally soft crushed limestone except in the southern and northwestern sections where medium-hard Ohio and Wabash river gravel occur.
Iowa In the Des Moines and central Iowa area medium-hard pit and river gravel are typical. Aggregates found in the eastern, central and southwestern sections are soft limestone. The eastern border along the Mississippi River has hard chert river gravel. Medium-hard pit gravel with quartzite is found in the northwestern section.
Kansas The aggregate conditions generally found are soft limestone. Medium-hard limestone, dolomite and hard chert gravel are found in the southeastern section, and medium-hard pit gravel in the north central area.
Kentucky Approximately 90% of the state has aggregates of medium-soft limestone and sandstone. The northern section along the Ohio River has medium-hard quartzite river gravel.
Louisiana Aggregate conditions in the state range from soft shell to hard chert.
Maine In general a medium-hard dolomitic gravel and some traprock is encountered in this state.
Maryland About 60% of the state has medium-soft limestone aggregate. The balance of the state has a medium-hard river gravel.
Massachusetts The aggregate generally found is medium traprock except in northern section bordering New Hampshire where the aggregate is medium-hard.
Michigan Generally medium-hard glacial gravel is found. The Pontiac, Flint, Mount Clemens area contains fair amounts of hard chert or flint.
Minnesota Aggregate in the central and northern part of the state consists of medium-hard glacial gravel. In the southern section medium-soft quarried limestone prevails.
Mississippi Hard and medium-hard aggregates are found in the southwest section of the state and consist of the chert and quartzite.
Missouri Soft limestone aggregate predominates in this state with a hard chert aggregate in the St. Louis area (Meramec River gravel) and a similar hard flint aggregate in the Joplin area.
Montana The eastern section is a hard aggregate area, the Great Falls area contains a medium-hard gravel and crushed stone aggregate and the Glasgow and Miles City areas have a hard quartz and chert aggregate.
Nebraska Eastern and Central sections contain a medium limestone and gravel mixture and the Western areas have a straight medium-hard gravel aggregate.
Nevada The predominant aggregates are medium to medium-hard gravel and crushed decomposed granite.
New Hampshire Generally medium-hard to hard granite gravel aggregates are encountered.
New Jersey The predominant aggregates are a medium traprock and a hard river gravel.
New Mexico Northern areas contain medium-soft aggregate shipped in from Colorado. A medium limestone with some quartz aggregate is encountered in the southern part of the state (Gallup, Alamogordo, Deming and Lordsburg). The Tucumcari area has a medium-hard gravel aggregate. A medium-hard to hard gravel is encountered in the Albuquerque area.
New York There are three predominant aggregates in this state, a medium-soft limestone, medium traprock and medium to medium-hard granitic gravel.
North Carolina Medium-hard and hard aggregates exist throughout the state and consist of granites, schist, gneiss and quartzite. There is some scattering of a medium limestone.
North Dakota In general a medium-hard glacial gravel is encountered consisting of limestone, granitic gneiss, basalt, quartzite and chert. In the eastern half of the state the aggregate combinations are medium-soft.
Ohio Generally a medium-soft pit gravel is encountered throughout the state except in the areas along the Ohio River where a medium-hard river bed aggregate is used.
Oklahoma Soft limestone is generally encountered except in the western section where a medium-hard granite aggregate is used.
Oregon The western section contains a hard granite aggregate an on the east side of the mountains a medium crushed gravel is encountered.
Pennsylvania Generally medium-soft limestone and medium traprock aggregate are encountered except in steel mill areas where soft slag might be used. Pit gravel is commonly used in the Philadelphia area.
Rhode Island A medium hard traprock aggregate is generally used throughout the state.
South Carolina Predominantly the aggregates consist of a medium-hard quartzite, granite and gneiss with some limited amounts of medium-soft crushed limestone and marble.
South Dakota There are three types of aggregate encountered in this state. The eastern area consists of hard quartzite aggregate, the central portion has a medium-hard gravel aggregate and soft limestone aggregates in the western section.
Tennessee In general medium-hard aggregates are encountered throughout the state with some medium quartzite west of Nashville and hard chert aggregate along the Mississippi River.
Texas The predominant aggregate encountered consist of medium limestone and dolomite with a medium-hard quartzite around the San Antonio area and hard chert along the Coast area.
Utah Aggregates consist of medium gravel throughout the state.
Vermont In general medium to medium-hard granitic gravel aggregate is encountered throughout the state. Large aggregate is often encountered.
Virginia Medium-hard granite gates are normally encountered throughout the state with medium-hard to river gravel in the Norfolk and Washington D.C. areas.
Washington Medium to medium-hard gravel and crushed stone aggregate encountered on the eastern side mountains and hard gravel aggregate on the western side and in the Seattle Tacoma areas.
West Virginia The predominant aggregates consist of a medium limestone, except along the Kana where medium-hard to hard river aggregates are used.
Wisconsin The southern section state contains medium-soft limestone gravel aggregates. The northern have a medium-soft glacial aggregate.
Wyoming Medium to medium-soft stone and crushed rock are encountered throughout the state.

4. Steel Reinforcement
Further strengthening and structural integrity of concrete is accomplished by introducing concrete reinforcing steel bars (rebar), steel wire strand of wire meshing into the concrete. It costs more to cut concrete that contains reinforcing steel because cutting rates are slower and blade life is reduced. If the cross-sectional area of concrete is 1% steel, the blade life will be about 25% shorter than if no steel were present. Concrete with 3% steel can reduce blade life as much as 75%.

Standard Reinforcing Bars
Metric Size
(mm)
Diameter Imperial Size
(inches)
Diameter
10 9.5 #3 .375
13 12.7 #4 .500
16 15.9 #5 .625
19 19.1 #6 .750
22 22.2 #7 .875
25 25.4 #8 1.000
29 28.7 #9 1.128
32 32.3 #10 1.270

Heavy Rebar: #6 Rebar every 12" on center or 2 Mats of #4 Rebar every 12" on center
Medium Rebar: #4 Rebar every 12" on center
Light Rebar: Wire Mesh, single mat
Back to Understanding Materials | Back to top
Asphalt
Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) is a mixture of Asphalt Cement (a petroleum-based “glue” that comprises less than 8%, by weight, the total pavement mixture) and Aggregates (various sized stones, dust, hard inert materials and sand, comprising approximately 92%, by weight, the remaining pavement mixture.)

Asphalt does not cure in the sense that concrete does, and once spread and rolled, it can be cut or drilled almost immediately. Unlike cured concrete, sand in asphalt never bonds as firmly, and the slurry created when sawing will be extremely abrasive. A bond matrix similar to cutting green concrete and undercutting protection steel cores are important factors when undertaking asphalt cutting operations. Some unique factors should be observed when cutting asphalt:
Hard & large sized Aggregates in the asphalt will cause the blade to cut slower
The greater the Aggregate-Sand ratio, the faster the blade will cut, but total footage may decrease
Total asphalt depth can vary. It is common to cut through the asphalt layer into the sub-base. Generally, the sub-base contains a high content of very abrasive materials such as sand, dirt, dusts and like materials. This undesirable situation causes rapid wear of the diamond blade
Chunks or broken-up asphalt to be cut often attract dirt and sand fillers within the cracks. This, too, will make the asphalt more abrasive and affect the life of the diamond blade
Back to Understanding Materials | Back to top
Understanding Diamond Blades
1. Diamond Blade Fabrication
Diamond blades consist of four components: diamond crystals, a bonding system, a segment, and a metal core.

Diamond Crystals
The diamond crystals in MK blades are synthetic (man-made) rather than natural. This gives them a consistency that can be relied upon during the enormous stresses they encounter while grinding. The foremost performance factor in diamond-blade sawing is the type, concentration and size of these diamond crystals. The extensive diamond aptitude and sawing expertise MK has acquired goes into the selection of the proper diamond crystals for our wide range of blades.

Bonding Matrix
Diamond crystals are held in place by a sintering process of specially blended metal powders. This bonding matrix is crucial to the overall performance of the MK diamond blade and serves several vital functions:

  • Disperses and supports the diamonds
  • Provides controlled wear while allowing diamond protrusion
  • Prevents diamond “pull-out”
  • Acts as a heat sink
  • Distributes impact and load as the diamond attacks the cutting surface

During the sawing action, the wearing away of the matrix exposes new diamond crystals providing fresh cutting points for the blade.

Metal Bonds
The diamond crystals and bonding matrix are heated and shaped into specially engineered rims / segments. These rims / segments are wider than the blade core to which they will be attached, and provide the clearance to promote material discharge and discourage blade binding. The rims / segments are specifically designed to wear at a rate appropriate to the material being cut. Large particles of soft, abrasive materials wear down the matrix faster than the small particles removed from hard dense materials. Therefore, softer, more abrasive materials require a “tough to wear” (hard) bond; less abrasive materials require an “easy wear” (soft) bond.

Premium Steel Core
The diamond saw blade cores are made from high alloy, heat-treated steel. Depending on the type of blade selected, the steel cores are specifically designed to support the appropriate rim or segment. About the periphery of the core, the various rims or segments are affixed through a brazing or laser welding process. An arbor hole is precisely bored in the center, and the entire core is “tensioned” or tuned so that the stresses of centripetal force are minimized, permitting the blade to spin true on the spindle.



2. Understanding Diamond Blades As Cutting Tools
In general, a diamond blade's performance is measured in two ways. The first is how proficiently the blade grinds through the material; the second is the life of the blade or total footage yielded by the blade. There are a variety of MK diamond blade models and designs from which to choose. Each blade is meticulously engineered to provide cutability, longevity and safety. When you select the best-suited diamond blade for the job / application / material, you will ensure peak performance and maximum investment return.

How the Diamond Blade Works
Diamond blades do not really cut, instead they grind material through an action of friction with the synthetic diamond-bonding matrix. The diamond crystals, often visible at the leading edge and sides of the rim / segment, remove material by scratching out particles of hard, dense materials, or by knocking out larger particles of loosely bonded abrasive material. This process eventually cracks or fractures the diamond particle, breaking it down into smaller pieces. As a result of this phenomenon, a diamond blade for cutting soft, abrasive material must have a hard metal matrix composition to resist this erosion long enough for the exposed diamonds to be properly utilized. Conversely, a blade for cutting a hard, non-abrasive material must have a soft bond to ensure that it will erode and expose the diamonds embedded in the matrix. These simple principles are the foundation of “controlled bond erosion.”


Types of Diamond Blade Cutting
There are two basic types of cutting – dry or wet. The best choice of blade depends upon:
The requirements of the job
The machine / tool utilizing the diamond blade
The preference of the operator

In the case of DRY cutting, the overwhelming popularity and quantity of hand-held saws and the flexible nature of MK Diamond blades to professionally handle most ceramic, masonry, stone and concrete materials, make the DRY cutting blade a very attractive tool.
When using a DRY blade, the user must be aware of distinct operating practices to ensure optimum performance. DRY cutting blades require sufficient airflow about the blade to prevent overheating of the steel core. This is best accomplished by shallow, intermittent cuts of the material along with periods of “free-spinning” for several seconds to maximize the cooling process.

For WET cutting applications, MK has the exact blade to complement both the material to be cut and the wet-cutting machine to be used. During cutting operations, liberal amounts of water act as a coolant to support the cutting effectiveness and longevity of the WET blade. Additionally, using water adds to the overall safety of cutting operations by keeping the dust signature down.
Back to Understanding Diamond Blades | Back to top
Diamond Blade Troubleshooting
Blade Worn Out of Round | Blade Wobbles | Blade Will Not Cut
Segment Loss | Uneven Segment Wear | Cracks in Steel Center
Arbor Hole Out-of-Round | Loss of Tension | Undercutting the Steel Center
Short Blade Life | Segment Cracks
Blade Worn Out of Round
Cause Shaft bearings are worn (masonry and concrete).
Remedy Install new blade shaft bearings or blade shaft, as required.
Cause Engine is not properly tuned on concrete saws, causing surges in blade rotation.
Remedy Tune engine according to manufacturers' manual.
Cause Blade arbor hole is damaged from previous mismounting.
Remedy Replace worn shaft or mounting arbor bushing. Bond is too hard for material, causing a “rounding” and wearing one half of the blade more than the other. Make certain that drive pin is functioning. Use proper blade specification
Back to Diamond Blade Troubleshooting | Back to top
Blade Will Not Cut
Cause Blade is too hard for material being cut.
Remedy Use a softer bonded blade. Select proper blade specification for material being cut.
Cause Blade has become dull as a result of being used on too hard a material
Remedy Improper blade specification; blade is too hard for the material being cut. Use a softer bonded blade to reduce operating stresses.
Cause "Dull" Blade
Remedy "Open" blade by dressing segment on abrasive block.
Back to Diamond Blade Troubleshooting | Back to top
Uneven Segment Wear
Cause Insufficient water (usually on one side of blade).
Remedy Flush out water system and check flow and distribution to both sides of blade.
Cause Equipment defects cause the segments to wear unevenly.
Remedy Replace bad bearings, worn arbor shaft or misalignment to spindle. Concrete saws, engine must run smoothly to prevent harmonic vibration.
Cause Saw is misaligned.
Remedy Check saw head alignment for squareness both vertically and horizontally
Back to Diamond Blade Troubleshooting | Back to top
Arbor Hole Out-of-Round
Cause Blade collar is not properly tightened, permitting blade rotation or vibration on the shaft.
Remedy Tighten the shaft nut with a wrench to make certain that the blade is adequately secured.
Cause Blade collars are worn or dirty, not allowing proper blade clamping.
Remedy Clean blade collars, making sure they are not worn.
Cause Blade is not properly mounted.
Remedy Make certain the blade is mounted on the proper shaft diameter before tightening shaft nut. Ensure the pin hole slides over drive pin. Make sure that drive pin is in pin hole.
Cause Loose Belt on saw.
Remedy Tighten belts. Check to see if arbor on saw is running true.
Back to Diamond Blade Troubleshooting | Back to top
Undercutting the Steel Center
Cause Abrasion of steel center due to highly abrasive fines generated during cutting.
Remedy Use as much water as possible to flush out fines generated during cutting, or use wear-retardant cores.
Cause Cutting through material into sub-base.
Remedy Wear-retardant cores are not always the ultimate solution to eliminating undercutting. Your best defense is to always provide an adequate water flow to the steel center area immediately adjacent to the segment. This is especially important when making deep cuts.
Back to Diamond Blade Troubleshooting | Back to top
Segment Cracks
Cause Blade is too hard for material being cut.
Remedy Use a blade with a softer bond.
Cause Blade being "forced" through the cut causing chattering
Remedy Run Saw at normal speed. "Open" blade by resharpening in abrasive material.
Back to Diamond Blade Troubleshooting | Back to top
Blade Wobbles
Cause Blade runs at improper speed.
Remedy Check for bad bearings, bent shaft, or worn mounting arbor.
Speed of the saw is either too fast or too slow for the size of the blade: RPM of the saw should be verified to the specific speeds established by the NASI Standards for minimum and Maximum blade speeds; make certain that blade shaft is running at recommended RPM to match tensioned speed of blade. Should the blade continue to wobble after verification of the saw RPM, then the blade should be returned to the manufacturer to be retensioned and flattened.
Cause Blade collar diameters are not identical.
Remedy Check blade collar discs to make sure they are clean, flat and of correct diameter
Cause Blade is bent as a result of dropping or being twisted in the cut during operation.
Remedy Blade should be returned to the manufacturer to be retensioned and flattened.
Cause Loss of blade tension.
Remedy loss of tension
Back to Diamond Blade Troubleshooting | Back to top
Segment Loss
Cause Overheating due to lack of water.
Remedy Check water feed lines and make sure flow is adequate on both sides of blade.
Cause Steel center is worn from undercutting.
Remedy Use sufficient water to flush out the cut.
Cause Defective blade collars are causing blade misalignment.
Remedy Clean blade collars or replace if collars are under recommended diameter.
Cause Blade is too hard for material being cut.
Remedy Use proper blade specification for material being cut.
Cause Blade is cutting out of round, causing a pounding motion.
Remedy Replace worn bearings; realign blade shaft or replace worn blade mounting arbor.
Cause Improper blade tension.
Remedy Ensure blade is running at correct RPM. Blade is tensioned for correct RPM. Tune engine according to manufacturers' manual.
Back to Diamond Blade Troubleshooting | Back to top
Cracks in Steel Center
Cause Blade flutters in cut as a result of blade losing tension.
Remedy Tighten the blade shaft nut. Make sure blade is running at proper tensioned speed and that drive pin is functioning properly.
Cause Blade specification is too hard for the material being cut.
Remedy Use a softer blade bond to eliminate stresses that create cracks.
Cause Bad blade shaft bearing.
Remedy Replace blade shaft bearing.
Cause Overheating due to lack of water.
Remedy Check water feed lines and make sure flow is adequate on both sides of blade.
Back to Diamond Blade Troubleshooting | Back to top
Loss of Tension
Cause Steel center has been overheating as a result of blade spinning on arbor.
Remedy Check water flow, distribution and lines. Tighten the blade shaft nut. Make certain the drive pin is functioning (on concrete saws).
Cause Steel center has been overheating from rubbing the side of material being cut.
Remedy Make certain blade RPM is correct so the blade operates at its tensioned speed. Tune engine according to manufacturers' manual.
Cause Unequal pressure at blade clamping collars.
Remedy Blade clamping collars must be identical in diameter and the recommended size.
Back to Diamond Blade Troubleshooting | Back to top
Short Blade Life
Cause Blade bond or matrix too soft.
Remedy Use a harder matrix blade.
Cause Overheating due to lack of water.
Remedy Check water feed lines and make sure flow is adequate on both sides of blade.
Back to Diamond Blade Troubleshooting | Back to top
Documents
Tile Product PDFs | Stone Product PDFs | Masonry Products PDFs
Concrete Products PDFs | Coring Products PDFs
Tile Product PDFs
Tile Products PDFs                                         
24" Cutting Kit Installation 250 KB
ATS Stand Owners' Manual 1.1 MB
MK-101 Blade Alignment Procedure 238 KB
MK-101 Cutting Head Stop Installation 189 KB
MK-170 New Rip Fence Installation 20 KB
MK-370/470 Splash Hood Use 96 KB
MK-770 Blade Alignment 327 KB
Back to Documents | Back to top
Stone Product PDFs
MK-70
Complete Manual 1.9 MB


MK-312/412/512 Stone Saws
Complete Manual 4.5 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 1.4 MB
Back to Documents | Back to top
Masonry Products PDFs
Masonry Products PDFs                                  
Brick Saw Stand Setup 72 KB
BX-3 Stand Setup 51 KB
MK-1080 Blade Alignment Procedure 175 KB
MK-1080 Head Stop Installation 60 KB
Back to Documents | Back to top
Concrete Products PDFs
Concrete Products PDFs
Water Tank Strap Assembly Instructions 342 KB
Water Pump Installation Instructions 3.7 MB
Back to Documents | Back to top
Coring Products PDFs
Manta I Manual
Complete Manual 1.9 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 990 KB

Manta II Manual
Complete Manual 2 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 956 KB

Manta III Manual
Complete Manual 2.2 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 1.3 MB

Manta IV Manual
Complete Manual 4.4 MB
Exploded View & Parts List 469 KB

MK-2000P Drill Manual
Complete Manual 85 Kb
Back to Documents | Back to top
Shopping Cart more
0 items
Bestsellers
01.Wax Pencils
02.NEO FLEX - Wet Diamond Polishing Pads
03.BD-250 - Granite and Porcelain Tile Blades
04.Euro Seg - GP Masonry and Concrete cutting
05.EC Flex - Wet Diamond Polishing Pads
06.DP Typhoon - Wet Diamond Polishing Pads
07.EP6 - Profiling granite, marble and Natural Stone
08.MK - Tile Saw Side Extension Table
09.ALUMINUM OXIDE Sandpaper
10.Euro Turbo -Cutting Tile, Brick, Block, Concrete, bluestone, flagstone, granite, and stone diamond blades
Reviews more
There are currently no product reviews
Languages
English
Currencies
What's New? more
Buy 5 T-SEG 100 Turbo saw blade and get 15% OFF
Buy 5 T-SEG 100 Turbo saw blade and get 15% OFF

Copyright © 2007 Diamond Blade. All rights reserved.
Diamond Blade Depot LLC